Sunday, September 18, 2016

Headed to LAS GNOME!

By the time this gets posted on the blog, I will be headed to LAS GNOME. I'm really looking forward to being there!

I'm on the schedule to talk about usability testing. Specifically, I'll discuss how you can do usability testing for your own open source software projects. Maybe you think usability testing is hard—it's not! Anyone can do usability testing! It only takes a little prep work and about five testers to get enough useful feedback that you can improve your interface.

As part of my presentation, I'll use our usability tests from this summer's GNOME usability tests as examples. Diana, Renata and Ciarrai did a great job on their usability testing.

These usability testing projects also demonstrate three different methods you can use to examine usability in software:

Ciarrai did a paper prototype test of the new GNOME Settings. A paper prototype is a useful test if you don't have the user interface nailed down yet. The paper prototype test allows you to examine how real people would respond to the interface while it's still mocked up on paper. If you have a demo version of the software, you can do a variation of this called an "animated prototype" that looks a lot like a traditional usability test.

Renata performed a traditional usability test of other areas of ongoing development in GNOME. This is the kind of test most people think of when they hear about usability testing. In a traditional usability test, you ask testers to perform various tasks ("scenario tasks") while you observe what they do and take notes of what they say or how they attempt to complete the tasks. This is a very powerful test that can provide great insights to how users approach your software.

Diana led a user experience (UX) test of users who used GNOME for the first time. User experience is technically different from usability. Where usability is about how easily real people can accomplish real tasks using the software, user experience focuses more on the emotional reaction these people have when using the software. Usability and user experience are often confused with each other, but they are separate concepts.

I hope to see you at the conference!
Interested in my slides from LAS GNOME? You can find them on my personal website at www.freedos.org/jhall/uploads/. I'll keep them there for at least the next few weeks.
image: LAS GNOME

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