Sunday, December 10, 2017

The art of the usability interview

During a usability test, it's important to understand what the tester is thinking. What were they looking for when they couldn't find a button or menu item? During the usability test, I recommend that you try to observe, take notes, capture as much data as you can about what the tester is doing. Only after the tester is finished with a scenario or set of scenarios should you ask questions.

But how do you ask questions in a way to gain the most insight? Asking the right questions can sometimes be an art form; it certainly requires practice. A colleague shared with me a few questions she uses in her usability interviews, and I am sharing them here for your usability interviews:

Before starting a scenario or set of scenarios:

  • What are three things you might do in this application?
  • What menu options do you see here and what do you think they do?
  • What might you do on this panel?
  • What is your first impression of the application?
  • What do these icons do? What do they represent?

After finishing a set of scenarios:

  • Who do you think the application was created for?
  • How easy did you think it was to get around the application?
  • If you could make one change to the application, what would it be?
  • Is there a feature you think is missing?
  • Do you remember any phrases or icons that you didn't understand?


The goal is to avoid leading questions, or any questions that suggests a "right" and "wrong" answer.

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