Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Using groff to write papers

In 1993, I discovered Linux, when I was an undergraduate university student. Linux gave me the same power as the Big Unix systems in our campus computer labs, but on my personal computer. I was immediately hooked.

But in the early 1990s, Linux didn't have a lot of applications. When I needed a word processor to write a paper for class, I rebooted into MS-DOS and ran WordPerfect or the shareware word processor, Galaxy Write. I wanted to stay in Linux as much as possible, but I also needed to write papers for class.

I knew a bit about the nroff and troff text processing systems from our campus computer labs, and I was pleased to find that nroff and troff existed on Linux as GNU groff. So I taught myself how to use the groff macro sets to write my class papers. The first macros I learned were the "e" macros, also known as "groff -me" because that was how you invoked the macros from the command line.

I recently wrote an article for OpenSource about How to format academic papers on Linux with "groff -me." I cover the basics for writing most papers, and skip the really esoteric stuff like keeps and displays, nested lists, tables, and figures. This is just an introduction for how to use "groff -me" to write common documents, like papers for class.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Note: Only a member of this blog may post a comment.