Saturday, December 16, 2017

Top ten in 2017 (part 1 of 2)

It's been a great year in the usability of open source software. As I look back on the last twelve months, I thought it would be interesting to highlight a few of my favorite blog posts from the year. And here they are, in no particular order:

1. The importance of the press kit
In December 2016, we released FreeDOS 1.2. Throughout December and into January, FreeDOS was the subject of many many articles in tech press, magazines, websites, and journals. I credit our press kit, which made it really easy for anyone to write an article about FreeDOS. In this essay, I explain how we created our press kit, and the features your open source software press kit should contain so journalists can write about you.
2. Good usability but poor user experience
I like to remind people that usability is not the same as user experience. They really are two different concepts. Usability is about making software that real people can use to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time. User experience is more about the emotional response users have when they use the software. Often, programs that have good usability will have a positive user experience, and vice versa. But it's possible for a program to have good usability and a negative user experience. Here's one example.
3. I can't read your website
The current trend in website design seems to be grey text on a light background. That's really hard for most people to read. And your small font sizes aren't helping, either. Here are a few examples of the same stanza of text in different styles. See also Calculating contrast ratios of text and The readability of DOS applications as interesting followup.
4. Screencasts for usability testing
When you're moderating a usability test, you may ask your testers to use the "speak aloud" protocol, where they say out loud what they are trying to do. If they are looking for a Print button, they should say "I'm looking for a Print button." As the tester works through the usability test, you might take notes about what the tester is doing, and where they are "looking" with their mouse. An easier way to track this is to record a screencast, for later playback. Here's an example in GNOME.
5. How many testers do you need?
Usability testing in open source software isn't that hard. But when I talk about how to do a usability test in open source software, most people ask me "How many testers do I need?" It turns out that you don't need that many people. The short answer is "about five."

I'll share part two of my top-ten list next week!

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