Thursday, January 18, 2018

Programming with ncurses

Over at Linux Journal, I am writing an article series about programming on Linux. While graphical user interfaces are very cool, not every program needs to run with a point-and-click interface. So in my "Getting started with ncurses" article series, I discuss how to write programs using the ncurses library functions.

Maybe you aren't familiar with curses or ncurses, but I guarantee you've run programs that use this library. Many programs that run in "terminal" mode, including vi editor, use the curses set of functions to draw to the screen. The curses functions allow you to put text anywhere on the screen, or read from the keyboard.

My article series starts with a simple example that demonstrates how to put characters and text on the screen. My example program is a chaos game iteration of Sierpinski's Triangle, which is a very simple program (only 73 lines).

Follow-up articles in the series will include a "Quest" program to demonstrate how to query the screen and use the arrow keys, and how to add colors.
Update:

Linux Journal has posted the second part of my article series: Creating an adventure game in the terminal using ncurses. And part three: Programming in color with ncurses. Soon to come: why the Linux console only has sixteen colors, and how to use windows and frames in ncurses.

Monday, January 1, 2018

Write about open source software

I just wanted to point out that over on the FreeDOS Blog, we're asking people to write about FreeDOS.

It's a new year, and we wanted to encourage people to contribute to FreeDOS in new ways. If you're already working on FreeDOS through code, design, testing, or some other technical way - thank you!

If you aren't sure how to contribute to FreeDOS, or want to contribute in a new way, we'd like to encourage you to try something new: Write about FreeDOS!

Write about something that interests you! Others will want to see how you're using FreeDOS, to run existing programs or to write your own programs. We want to hear from everyone! It's not just about developers, or people who contribute to the FreeDOS Project directly. Tell us how you use FreeDOS.

Post on your own blog, or email your articles to me and I'll put them up as a guest post on the FreeDOS Blog. If we can gather enough articles by Spring, we'll try to collect them in a "how-to" ebook in time for the 24th "birthday" of FreeDOS on June 29.