Wednesday, February 14, 2018

What open source software programs I love

Earlier this week, someone asked me what Free software and open source software programs I really love. I thought I'd share that here, too.

As I started to go through my favorite programs, I realized it was quite long. So I'm trying to keep the list short here, just the programs I use the most:

I'll start with Linux. I first installed Linux in 1993, when I was still an undergraduate university student. When I heard about Linux, a free version of Unix that I could run on my 386 computer at home, I immediately wanted to try it out. My first Linux distribution was Softlanding Linux System (SLS) 1.03, with Linux kernel 0.99 alpha patch level 11. That required a whopping 2MB of RAM, or 4MB if you wanted to compile programs, and 8MB to run X windows.

I ran a dual-boot Linux and Windows system at home until about 1998, using Windows only to play games. Then I switched to Linux full-time, and haven't looked back. Today, I run Fedora Linux, with GNOME as the desktop.

My other favorite operating system is FreeDOS, but that's not a surprise because I am the founder and project coordinator for the FreeDOS Project. FreeDOS is a complete, free, DOS-compatible operating system that you can use to play classic DOS games, run legacy business software, or develop embedded systems. Any program that works on MS-DOS should also run on FreeDOS.

I usually boot FreeDOS inside a PC emulator called QEMU. I used to run DOSEmu, which was ideal for writing FreeDOS programs because DOSEmu boots its C: drive from a folder in my Linux home directory. That made it really easy to transfer files between FreeDOS and Linux. In QEMU, I set up a folder that is mapped in QEMU as a D: drive.

I write a lot of articles, and now some books, and I use LibreOffice for all of my finish work. In total honesty, I do my collaboration and initial drafts via Google Docs, but all my final drafts and formatting is done in LibreOffice.

Many of my articles are about writing programs, and I use GNU Emacs as my editor. I'll use vim to write shell scripts, and GNOME gedit to edit web pages, but I prefer GNU Emacs for all my programming work. Emacs was my first Unix editor, even before I learned vi, so I'll always have a fondness for it.

While I could compile and debug programs from inside GNU Emacs, I prefer to do that work at the command line using GNOME Terminal.

For any graphics work, I rely on GIMP. This works great for creating graphics for my websites, or enhancing a personal photo, or creating a new cover for my next book.

And finally, I like to listen to music while I'm working, so I usually have Rhythmbox running in the background. I like to listen to one of several streaming radio stations, or I'll listen to my own MP3 music collection.

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